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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


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leaf What is an Herbarium?

leaf Genus Descriptions

leaf Species Descriptions

leaf Ontario FEC V-Types

leaf Bibliography

leaf Terminology

leaf Who Collects the Plants?

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leaf Nomenclature Primer

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Northern Ontario Plant Database

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Northern Ontario Vegetation Type (V-type)


NW-V2: Black Ash Hardwood & Mixedwood


Summary: Mainly a hardwood stand dominated by black ash, and often occurring in pure stands. However, in the Quetico/Rainy River area, black ash may occur as a minor component in a canopy dominated by trembling aspen. The most common secondary species, occurring in about 30% of sample plots, are balsam fir and trembling aspen. A variety of other hardwood and conifer tree species occur less consistently. Regeneration is primarily balsam fir. The fairly diverse shrub layer is dominated by a mixture of tall and low shrubs, including mountain maple, choke cherry, swamp red currant, and red osier dogwood.

The species-rich herb layer is very diverse and contains, dwarf raspberry, violets, ferns, bluejoint grass, sedges, and a variety of other forbs. The forest floor is dominated by broadleaf and graminoid litter, and patches of moss.

Soil & Ecosite Types: The Black Ash Hardwood & Mixedwood Vegetation Type (NW-V2) occurs on Ecosite Types ES 30 (Black Ash Hardwood, fresh, silty-clayey soil), ES 37 (Rich Swamp-Cedar (Other Conifer), organic soil), and ES 38 (Rich Swamp: Black Ash (Other Hardwood), organic-mineral soil). This vegetation type occurs on localized, bottomland or floodplain sites throughout northwestern Ontario, on deep, moist to wet mineral soils of lacustrine origin (S9-S10) or on wet organic soils (S11, S12F and S12S). Site Regions or Site Districts are not listed for this type.

Note: The percentage of sample plots that contained overstorey tree species is given in square brackets after each scientific name. Other species are listed in order of frequency, according to the NW-FEC manual.

Trees:
overstorey:
black ash (Fraxinus nigra) [10]
balsam fir (Abies balsamea) [3]
trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) [3]
white birch (Betula papyrifera) [2]
white spruce (Picea glauca) [1]
white cedar (Thuja occidentalis) [1]
red ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) [1]
white elm (Ulmus americana) [1]
balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera) [1]
regeneration:
balsam fir (Abies balsamea)
Shrubs:
tall shrubs:
mountain maple (Acer spicatum)
choke cherry (Prunus virginiana)
speckled alder (Alnus incana subsp. rugosa)
beaked hazel (Corylus cornuta)
low shrubs:
swamp red currant (Ribes triste)
red osier dogwood (Cornus sericea)
wild red raspberry (Rubus idaeus)
Dwarf Shrubs & Herbs:
dwarf shrubs:
dwarf raspberry (Rubus pubescens)
forbs:
violets (Viola spp.)
naked mitrewort (Mitella nuda)
fragrant bedstraw (Galium triflorum)
wild lily-of-the-valley (Maianthemum canadense)
dwarf enchanter's nightshade (Circaea alpina)
rose twisted-stalk (Streptopus lanceolatus)
wild sarsaparilla (Aralia nudicaulis)
largeleaf aster (Eurybia macrophylla)
starflower (Trientalis borealis)
graminoids:
bluejoint (Calamagrostis canadensis)
sedges (Carex spp.)
Ferns & Fern Allies:
ferns:
lady fern (Athyrium filix-femina)
spinulose woodfern (Dryopteris carthusiana)
horsetails:
woodland horsetail (Equisetum sylvaticum)
Bryophytes:
woodsy moss (Plagiomnium cuspidatum)
northern tree moss (Climacium dendroideum)
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